Beat the Summer Heat: Punam Chopra from SpiceBox Organics | HKYantoYan - HKYantoYan

Beat the Summer Heat: Punam Chopra from SpiceBox Organics

By on July 24, 2014

As the summer months roll by, it’s increasingly important to eat right—needless to say, its time to stay away from fiery foods, and opt for a cooling, soothing diet. Our expert, Punam Chopra, a holistic health counselor and the founder of SpiceBox Organics, will help you choose the right ingredients to get you through the hot summer days.

The Yin and Yang Philosophy

Traditional Chinese Medicine is an ancient science and philosophy that takes into account the four identified flavours –sweet, sour, bitter, and salty, and complements them with the nature of foods—cool, cold, warm, and hot. This philosophy is based on ‘when’ specific foods should be eaten (with the weather playing a major role), as well as advices ‘what’ to be eaten by different body types. The hot and dry weather during summer (along with the humidity in Hong Kong) affects the heart and lungs, and can create havoc. Dry skin, hair, and lips, constipation, red and irritable eyes, and heart palpitations are the usual markers to watch out for.

Today, more and more of us are learning to listen to our body and to reach out to foods that we feel is right for us. The natural trend during the summer is salads, cool drinks, juices, smoothies, less starchy vegetables, and many more.

Here is a list of cooling foods that traditional Chinese medicine recommends for this season. In addition they are filled with numerous health benefits and are extremely rich in antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.

 

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DIY: Sprouted Moong Bean Salad Recipe

My personal recommendation for salad and all raw foods is to use organic ingredients.

sprouts

 

Ingredients (serves 4):

1 cup Moong or Green Beans (raw)

1 cup chopped cucumber (peeled and deseeded)

1 cup chopped red onion

1 cup chopped or cherry tomatoes

1 cup shredded coconut

2 tablespoons fresh chopped mint leaves

1/2 cup lemon juice

2 – 3 tablespoons cold pressed Olive Oil (you may use your choice of oil as long as it’s cold pressed, and organic)

Salt and Pepper ( to taste)

1 tablespoon Honey

Sprouting Method

Sprouting makes the beans alive, increasing the nutrition threefold, and makes it easier to digest. The germination process of any lentil enhances its nutrition.

Soak 1 cup of moong beans overnight

Next morning, wash and rinse the beans and place in a bowl.

Take a wet muslin cloth and cover the beans.

Leave them standing for a day.

Check the muslin cloth and keep it wet over the beans.

Check on the beans and make sure they remain moist at all times.

By the second day, some sprouts should show.

By day three, you should see longer sprouts and they are ready to eat. Rinse them and keep in the fridge.

Salad Preparation

Place the sprouted moong beans, cucumber, onion, tomatoes, shredded coconut and mint in a bowl.

Mix the lemon juice, olive oil, and honey, in a hand blender (or use a salad dressing shaker). Add salt and pepper to taste. Blend or shake to create the dressing

Add the dressing to the salad mix and toss well. Serve as a side or as is. Enjoy!

SpiceBox Organics | 72 Third Street, G/F Shop K, Fook Moon Building, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong | Tel: +852 2568 2728

Store Timing: Monday to Saturday 10 am-8 pm; Sunday 12pm-6 pm

 

Punam Chopra
Punam is the founder of SpiceBox Organics, a specialty Organic Store located in Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong. She promotes healthy home cooking and provides a wide range of organic spices, grains, and health food products for all home kitchens and pantry needs. She is a yoga teacher, and nutrition health coach with a focus on Ayurveda. She can be contacted at [email protected]
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